/t/ - https://voidlinux.org/>Void is a general purpose operating system, based on the monolithic Linux® kernel. Its package system allows you to quickly install, update and remove software; software is provided in binary packages or can be built directly from


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 No.136[D]

https://voidlinux.org/
>Void is a general purpose operating system, based on the monolithic Linux® kernel. Its package system allows you to quickly install, update and remove software; software is provided in binary packages or can be built directly from sources with the help of the XBPS source packages collection.
https://wiki.voidlinux.org/
https://github.com/void-linux

I am using Void Linux myself, very fast on my old desktop and everything is easy to set up

 No.137[D]

O shit, I use void!~
Any way to delete the man page? I'm in an extremely storage limited environment

 No.147[D]

>>136
Never heard of it. Could you point out the advantages it has over other distros? What makes it unique? There are hundreds of distros already after all

 No.159[D]

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>>147
>it's not a fork
>it's lightweight
>it uses the fastest init scheme, runit
>it has good and fast package manager called xbps ("X Binary Package System")
>it's easy to create packages for Void Linux. also, xbps-src makes it easy to build packages from source.
>it's rolling-release but it doesn't break. and it still supports downgrades and partial upgrades (unlike Arch, for example)
>Void Linux also ships musl-based version in addition to glibc-based distro. musl is more lightweight and less bloated libc (but you probably still want to use glibc for desktop/laptop systems, though)
>it uses LibreSSL (it was the first Linux distro to switch to it, in fact)
Also, ProTip: if you want to have a GUI environment after installation, you must select the CD disc/USB stick as the installation source when the installer asks for it. You can get Void Linux here -> https://voidlinux.org/

 No.160[D]

>>159
If you choose to use the installer .iso to install a GUI, you must run sudo xbps-install -Su to install updates after installation. If you set Network as the installation source, you can easily install a GUI after installation by running:
sudo xbps-install -S xorg xfce4 linux-firmware wifi-firmware bash-completion
The -S option causes xbps to first sync the list of available packages and the -u option performs an upgrade.
If you want to also have a graphical login screen, follow these instruction: https://wiki.voidlinux.org/Post_Installation#Display_Manager
If you need proprietary software or microcode for your Intel CPU, you must first enable the non-free repository, like so:
sudo xbps-install void-repo-nonfree
and then install the microcode and everything else you need:
sudo xbps-install -S intel-ucode dwarffortress
and finally, regenerate the initramfs and update grub:
sudo xbps-reconfigure -f linux4.19 #replace the version number with the version that you have installed



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